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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Water use by irrigated cotton in Sudan. found in the catalog.

Water use by irrigated cotton in Sudan.

D. A. Rijks

Water use by irrigated cotton in Sudan.

by D. A. Rijks

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Published by Cotton Research Corporation in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Reprinted from: Journal of applied ecology, vol. 8, no. 3, 1971 pp. 643-663.

Other titlesJournal of applied ecology.
Statementby D.A. Rijks.
SeriesCotton Research Corporation Research memoirs -- no.84
ContributionsCotton Research Corporation.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18335026M

Stripling Irrigation Research Park in is presented in Figure 1. Withholding water for the first three weeks of flowering reduced seed cotton yields by lb/acre. These data again indicate the flowering period of cotton is very sensitive to water stress. Irrigation and rainfall amounts are presented in Table 1. Greater yield with less water Compared to conventional furrow, overhead sprinkler and center pivot irrigation, drip irrigation can yield 20% more cotton per 1 m3 of water under diverse agro-ecological conditions and without reducing lint quality.

often expressed in the Gezira, that most of the pre-irrigation water was lost from the soil before the cotton was sown, was shown to be true only for the topsoil; from a single April, May or July pre-irrigation, 41, 49 and 89% of the water stored in the soil remained at sowing time; from triple pre-irrigation (in April, May and July), 58% remained. e.g., tonnes of cotton produced for the volume of water consumed or polluted. This study establishes the relationship between cotton agricultural practices and technologies and the use of water and includes the following steps: 1. Calculating the green, blue and grey water footprint of cotton .

Nonconventional Water Resources. Prior to the introduction of UNICEF’s small bore hand pumps, villagers in western Sudan used to store water in the hollowed trunks of giant baobab trees (Adansonia digitata).In many other parts of the country, water is collected and stored in haffirs, a crude form of water harvesting for domestic, pastoralist and animal use in Darfur and Kordofan. Sudan Agricultural projects Water resources Water management Irrigation Agricultural development Food security Climate change The opinions expressed in this volume are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Nordic Africa Institute. ISSN ISBN Language editing: James Middleton.


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Water use by irrigated cotton in Sudan by D. A. Rijks Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sudan has the largest irrigated area in sub-Saharan Africa and the second largest in all Africa, after Egypt. The total estimated area fully equipped Water use by irrigated cotton in Sudan. book irrigation is 1, ha and an estimated cropped area of 1, ha, i.e. an estimated cropping intensity of 65%.

Water Requirements: Cotton is planted in Sudan on both flood irrigation systems and in rain-fed areas. Long season varieties are grown for days will require around m3 of water per Feddan and short season varieties grown around days and will require m3 of water per Feddan. Cotton cannot withstand high humidity or heavy rain.

Water use was simulated over a year period of varying rainfall and flow. Preliminary results indicate that currently irrigation demand in Sudan is approximately Bm 3 y-1 for million. Agricultural Water Use and Irrigation Development. The arable area in Sudan is nearly million feddans.

The irrigated area is less than 2 million feddans, whereas the rain-fed area is about 35 million feddans. The large agricultural schemes are almost all located in the central clay plains.

Gezira, Suki and Rahad are the largest. New Hydrological Insights for the Region. Egypt (67 km 3 yr −1) and Sudan (19 km 3 yr −1) consume the highest share of 84 km 3 yr −1 ().

Assuming today’s poor irrigation infrastructure, the total demand were predicted to increase to km 3 yr −1 (), an amount far exceeding the total annual yield of the Nile Basin. Therefore, a key challenge for water resources management in. Efficient irrigation starts with a sound irrigation water management, or scheduling.

While only about 35% of the cotton acreage in the U.S. is irrigated, for those acres that are irrigated, we must practice wise use of water and ensure that in water-limited regions we get the “most crop per drop,” or simply increased “water productivity.”.

Accordingly, there is a large room for a water saving opportunity in the Sudanese rainfed sector. It is worth mentioning that the grey water footprint is neglected herein as the rainfed agriculture in Sudan is a free-fertilizer practice, i.e. a risk management option taken by farmers and there is no re-use of the irrigation water or waste water.

inthe Jazīrah (Gezira) scheme distributes the waters of the Blue Nile through a 2,mile (4,km) network of canals and ditches to irrigate fields growing cotton and other cash crops.

This scheme has made Al-Jazīrah the most productive agricultural area of Sudan. Water for the scheme is. The year was the third in a row for commercial planting of Bt cotton in Sudan.

A total of 90, hectares up f hectares in were planted in both rain-fed and irrigated areas by close to 30, farmers, a three-fold increase from the init beneficiaries. The total hectarage of Bt cotton of 90, was distributed.

In the course of investigations into the use of water by cotton crops in the Sudan Gezira ina detailed analysis of the radiation balance over the crop and over the desert soil.

1), supplemental irrigation is prac-ticed across the entire Cotton Belt. How Cotton Plants Use Water Cotton, like all land plants, must maintain enough water in its cells and tissues to be able to grow and develop.

Without adequate water, cells cannot expand and contribute to plant growth. An expanding bal-loon is a lot like a growing cell.

WATER USE BY IRRIGATED COTTON IN SUDAN II. NET RADIATION AND SOIL HEAT FLUX BY D. RIJKS* Cotton Research Corporation, Cotton Research Station, Namulonge, P.O. BoxKampala, Uganda In the course of investigations into the use of water by cotton crops in the Sudan Gezira inthe radiation balance over the crop was analysed.

Cotton was first grown in the area in After many experiments with irrigation, 24 square kilometres ( sq mi) was put under cultivation in After the lowest Nile flood for years, the Sennar Dam was constructed on the Blue Nile to provide a reservoir of water.

This dam was completed in and is about 3 kilometres ( mi) long. In the first half of the 20th century, colonial rulers, a British firm and Sudanese farmers changed the Gezira Plain in Sudan into a large-scale irrigated cotton scheme.

Gezira continues to be in. Irrigated cotton Sprayed cotton refuge – an area of irrigated conventional cotton that is equal to % of the area of Bollgard II on the farm (refer to refuge planting dates), which can be conventionally managed for Helicoverpa spp.

and other pests. No Bt products may be included at any stage. represents nearly 40% of GDP, until the mid-eighties, traditional irrigated cotton was the Sudan's main exported product, which represented almost half of the total exports in the s. Oilseeds, Gum Arabic, livestock, and sorghum (Dura) make up most of the balance.

The industrial sector in Sudan was lagging. water use 57 Change in ETo with from ocean, California 57 Change in Epan (Hudson) for cross-section over cotton Euid fallow fields in Sudan 58 Correction factor for ETcrop when determined using chmatic data collected outside or prior to irrigation development for different sizes of irrigated fields under arid and moderate wind.

to the present irrigation area of million fd (aboutha). The climatic conditions are favorable to year-round cultivation, and the physical properties of the impermeable clay soils show a tendency to water-logging which badly depress the yields.

The quality of the Blue Nile water is excellent for irrigation. Agriculture is a major user of ground and surface water in the United States, accounting for approximately 80 percent of the Nation's consumptive water use and over 90 percent in many Western States.

Efficient irrigation systems and water management practices can help maintain farm profitability in an era of increasingly limited and more costly water supplies. Agriculture is generally divided, based on source of water, to irrigated and rain-fed. The most salient features of agricultural production in Sudan are low productivity, low value of crops, high fluctuation in areas and low water use efficiency (WUE).

Irrigated Agriculture The total area of the irrigated sub-sector is about Million. This book summarizes results from a long-term research project addressing land and water use in irrigated areas of the Aral Sea basin. In an interdisciplinary approach, natural and human sciences are combined to elucidate challenges of economic transition that affect the use of land, water and biological resources, ecological sustainability, economic efficiency and the livelihoods of the local.Sudan - Irrigation Projects (English) Abstract.

This report reviews, and evaluates the technical feasibility of irrigation in Sudan, namely as it regards the implementation of the Managil, and Roseires Projects. Regarding the Managil Project, based on the capital cost of construction through stages.Center pivot sprinkler irrigation systems are among the most popular mechanical-move systems for applying irrigation water to field crops like cotton, and are used on over half of the sprinkler-irrigated area in the U.S.

The basic design concept has been improved and refined, but remains very similar to the original system invented and patented.